Sore muscles after dance class

Dance Class

If you’re a dancer, chances are you’ve had your fair share of sore muscles after a particularly difficult dance class. Sore muscles don’t mean you’ve overdone it, though, they just mean you’ve worked hard! However, soreness can interfere with your day-to-day life and there are some tried and true methods to get through it!

To treat and care for sore muscles, remember to warm up before you dance, cool down after class, and practice self-care.  Use techniques like massage, foam rolling, taking Epsom salt baths, and resting!

Sore muscles may sometimes be the result of an injury or overuse. If soreness persists for longer than a couple of days, you may want to consult a medical professional. The advice you read here is no substitute for actual medical care.

The advice you read here is no substitute for actual medical care.

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Port Orange Dance Studio Promotes Good Attendance in Dance Class

Legacy port orange dance

The effects of poor attendance at school have been well documented over the years. Students from pre-k through high school are at risk of developing low self-esteem, missing important social milestones, and falling behind their peers simply because of poor attendance. In our Port Orange dance studio, attending up to dance class consistently and on time contributes to the positive culture that dance studios wish to achieve.

When considering dance classes for your child in Port Orange, even at the recreational level, you’re making a commitment to attend regularly. Good attendance in dance class promotes discipline, respect, and retention of information. 

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How to Create a Positive Dance Studio Environment

Port Orange Dance Studio

At The Legacy Dance Studio in Port Orange, owner and director Shannon Thomas strives to promote a culture of positivity, inclusivity, and integrity through dance education. Dancers and families at The Legacy Dance Studio can expect to be welcomed with open arms from the very first dance class to the final bow.

Our positive dance studio culture embraces four core values that our staff follows in each interaction with students and dance families – Positivity, Leadership, Integrity, and Education. 

But we can’t do it alone! Dance parents, guardians, and students all have a role to play in creating a positive dance studio culture so that everyone involved has a great experience.

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Port Orange Dance Studio Stresses the Importance of Staying Hydrated in Dance Class

dance classes in Port Orange

Florida is known for its beautiful weather year-round. But, that also means that dancers are often taking dance classes at dance studios in temperatures above 80 degrees Fahrenheit! At a Port Orange dance studio like The Legacy Dance Studio, dancers are encouraged to stay hydrated during dance classes.

In order to stay hydrated during dance class, you need to be sure to hydrate both before and after dance class, as well as eat foods with high water content.

Staying hydrated during dance classes is part of being a healthy, safe, and smart dancer. The Legacy Dance Studio in Port Orange takes dancer health seriously, and always strives to keep dancers safe.

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Three Ways to Improve Your Dance Technique TODAY!

Pointe and ballet classes Port Orange

Dancers of all kinds are always looking for more ways to improve their dance technique, from ballet dancers hoping to get just one more pirouette, to tap dancers who work tirelessly to execute the perfect wings. In this article, we will focus on dance technique as it relates to ballet and jazz dance, but these suggestions will undoubtedly help all kinds of dancers!

In order to improve your dance technique, you should focus on your core strength, continue to stretch daily, and importantly for many dancers, stay in ballet class!

While ballet isn’t the end-all be-all of dance techniques, it certainly does help to know and practice the basics to improve in styles like contemporary and jazz.

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The Different Types of Dance Studio – Explained

ballet performances

Choosing a dance studio for your child can be an overwhelming experience if you don’t know what to look for. From recreational dance classes to a more competitive environment, there really isPort Orange dancers something for everyone in the dance studio world, and specifically here in the Daytona Beach area.

When choosing a dance studio for your child, there are several types of environments. Daycare dance classes, recreational dance studios, ballet studios, and competitive dance studios are all options to consider.

By doing some research ahead of time, you can make the process of choosing the best dance studio for your tiny dancer easy and fun!

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5 Tips for Split Leaps

Dance leapImproving split leaps is a something dancers work on consistently in ballet, jazz, and contemporary/modern dance classes. Whether you are practicing grand jeté or saut de chat, below are a few tips to get you flying in the air looking fabulous!

Preparation

Be sure to build momentum into the preparation. Whether you are starting the leap with a glissade, chasse or a step – there should be a large amount of energy expanded into the preparatory step. Pushing through the floor with a strong core and body alignment is sure to start you off on the right path for a strong leap. Articulating the foot before AND after the jump is vital to success.

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How to be a Effort Oriented Dancer

Port Orange Dance Studio

Port Orange Dance StudioEffort – The definition is a vigorous or determined attempt.

How can we instill qualities in students to ensure they are putting forth their best efforts with a growth mindset?

Below are examples taken directly from class room and stage experiences. Utilizing these qualities in the class room will guarantee your students are on the way to becoming a dancer that can see their growth potential and use hard work to reach their goals.

Understanding Patterns: 

Giving students opportunities to identify patterns in daily class work is imperative. During ballet barre, incorporate specific patterns that replicate those same patterns that will be seen later in center work. Mention the intention and purpose for the use of the pattern given. Give as many examples as possible.

This will allow the dancer to retain the information, and memorize it more efficiently. Comprehension of patterns will increase speed, coordination and help with reversing the movement in different directions.

Spatial Awareness:

Spatial awareness can be incorporated in the very beginning of dance training at a young age. Dancers as young as 3 learn about spatial awareness as they are required to stand on their designated spot, follow the leader with out bumping other dancers and how to stand in line with out squishing their neighbor.

As they progress, they learn to stand in windows and take turns across the floor with a partner. All of these things requiring spatial awareness.

Spatial awareness is the ability to be aware of oneself in the space around you. Knowing the body positions and stage directions to travel freely while dancing and moving is the ultimate goal. As students progress in their training, this concept is imperative when performing or auditioning.

Thinking Ahead:

The famous quote, “dance now, think later” couldn’t be further from the truth. Dancers spend most of their young dance life thinking. And thinking some more.

Dance technique and body alignment are concepts that start with your thought process. Learning the correct muscles to use and even visualization exercises to help try to achieve the right look of a dancer.

Anticipation is the act of thinking ahead of oneself. When a dancer is performing ballet barre exercises, the brain must be faster than the pace of the music to relay the message to the body.

Dance is intellectual.

You are not only thinking of the steps, you are thinking of the technique behind the steps that will enable you to execute them correctly. When preparing for rehearsals and auditions; anticipating trouble spots will help you think on your toes and be ahead of the game when under stressful situations.

Understanding Different Techniques

A strong foundation in Ballet and Tap is a great start for young dancers! At 8 years old, the dancer is physically and mentally ready to introduce additional styles of dance to their training. Dance Classes in jazz, contemporary, hip hop and other dance techniques are highly encouraged to be the most well rounded dancer.

It is important that dancers educate themselves on the history that has impacted dance and paved the path as we know it today. Studying as many styles of dance will get you out of your comfort zone and give the knowledge needed to perform your best in class, on stage or at an audition.

Learning to be an effort oriented dancer takes time and constant training inside and outside of the studio, you too can achieve this if you put in the effort! 

Pageant Dance Choreography Tips

Pageant ChoreographyPageant Dance Choreography is a common talent choice among contestants in pageantry. Choreography can be interpreted in many different ways depending on the age of the performer, audience and judges observing the routine. Some dancers have very competitive, stylish and entertaining routines and others are more classical and technical with their performances.Continue reading

Spinal Roll Downs

Choreographer and Dance Studio Owner Shannon Thomas

port orange choreographerSpinal roll downs are one of the first movements performed in contemporary dance class to get the body warmed up. Not only is this a popular warm up for dancers, but is a favorite for actors and vocalists too.

Why? The spinal roll down helps to release tension in the entire body and increase blood flow. Check out some pointers below to ensure you are warming up your spine safely.

How to do a Spinal Roll Down

Start in a parallel, neutral stance. Be sure the spine is aligned and your weight is balanced. The head will initiate the roll down by dropping forward with your chin toward the chest. Imagine the top of your head is leading each vertebrae to curve over one at a time. The shoulders, upper and middle back will follow the curve over. As your head is lowering toward the ground, soften the knees and plié – being sure to hollow out the abdominal muscles and elongate the tailbone toward the floor. You can stay there and stretch or recover immediately. As the plié recovers, roll back up the spine reversing the roll down and pressing the abdominal muscles in. The head will be the last thing that lands back up right.

Common Mistakes

      Tension- Dancers new to this movement will most likely carry tension in their neck, arms, and bottom half. To help get the tension out, have them bounce like a rag doll to get the body to relax before starting roll downs. Imagine there is sand that is pouring from your body starting at your hands, fingertips, the top of your head- creating tiny little piles of sand in front of your feet and between your toes. as you recover, imagine the sand is being sucked back up the exact way it went down. Again, the end finishes the movement.

      Relaxed Core- It is super important that a roll down has support from the core. If you are not using your core to anchor the movement it can contribute to the tension in other body parts. Engaging the core takes a lot of practice and is the meat of many movements in all styles of dance. Imagine you are scooping out the abdominal muscles and hollowing out the curve, dropping the tailbone toward the floor to release lower back tension to complete the curve.

      Weight Shifting- Often times dancers have their weight too far over the heels. This is due to the pelvis shifting backward. If this is the situation it can help to imagine there is a wall close behind you (not directly behind) to help you to counterbalance your weight into the right place. In class you may hear your teacher say “weight over the balls of your feet dancers.” But, if you push your weight too far over the balls of your feet it can cause you to grip your toes that can cause tension and injury to the sole or arch of the foot.

      Releasing Hips too Soon- The pelvis should stay where it started for as long as possible during a roll down. A common mistake is dancers will activate the hip flexor muscles as the upper body bends forward. This creates a flat lower back with little to no curve in the lower spine. Think of elongating the tailbone through the floor and scooping out the tension to create a smooth connected roll.

The spinal roll down is an important part of dance technique, but sometimes it is seen as beginner step and is not approached or practiced with care or technique. This step is often done BEFORE plies if that tells you how important it is. Incorporating roll downs into dance technique classes will help students to warm up properly, engage numerous muscles and enhance their body mechanics to improve their dancing.